Join us at Tate Modern from 1 to 4 March 2018 for Shape’s second Tate Exchange programme Ghosts in the Machine, a series of workshops, interactive installations, events and performances looking at how people interact with and produce art that discusses disability.

Disabled people make up less than 5% of the arts and creative industries workforce, yet represent around 20% of the population. The works of disabled artists are rarely included in major exhibitions, collections and performance venues, yet disability arts has evolved as a significant cultural influence, and disabled artists are highly active and seeking recognition across all disciplines.

Interrogating the seen and the unseen with a number of disabled artists, Ghosts in the Machine aims to challenge and explore prevailing assumptions about the role of disabled people in art and culture and investigate the intersections of inclusion, (in)visibility and contribution.

Ghosts in the Machine is open to the public every day from 1 to 4 March 2018 on floor 5 of Tate Modern’s new Blavatnik building – drop in any time from 12 to 6pm, or see the full programme of events below:

  • Explore the living heritage of the Disability Arts Movement with Poppy Nash and NDACA's 'No More Pity'
  • Reveal your personal objects' hidden stories through photography techniques in Damien Robinson's workshop 'Object-Orientation'
  • Immerse yourself in Nina Thomas and Anahita Harding's interactive performance-installation 'We interrupt our disappearance'
  • See Noëmi Lakmaier's durational outdoor performance 'The Task of Containing', an homage to sculptor Adam Reynolds
  • Interact with Jason Wilsher-Mills' augmented reality sculpture 'Brave Boy Billy'
  • Take part in a digital drawing workshop to tell your own stories through art with Jason Wilsher-Mills

Ghosts in the Machine is suitable for all ages, and is fully wheelchair accessible and BSL interpreted.


Image: Sonja Zelic - An Invitation to Speak

Please contact [email protected] or 020 7424 7330 with any questions or access requirements.